GEMSTONES

BLUE SAPPHIRE

Sapphire is the most precious and valuable blue gemstone. It is a very desirable gemstone due to its excellent color, hardness, durability, and luster.

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

YELLOW SAPPHIRE

Yellow Sapphire is a highly precious, yellow colored gemstone of the Corundum mineral family. It is one of the most recognized gemstones in vedic astrology worn for professional success, marital bliss, improved will power and healthy progeny.

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

WHITE SAPPHIRE

white sapphire is a colorless sapphire. Although sapphires are usually thought of as a blue gemstone

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

PINK SAPPHIRE

Although commonly thought of as blue, sapphires naturally occur in a variety of colors including pink, yellow and green. Pink sapphires are stunning gemstones that range from light to dark pink. They can also include secondary hues like purplish pink sapphires and orangey pink stones like the rare Padparadscha sapphires.Although commonly thought of as blue, sapphires naturally occur in a variety of colors including pink, yellow and green. Pink sapphires are stunning gemstones that range from light to dark pink. They can also include secondary hues like purplish pink sapphires and orangey pink stones like the rare Padparadscha sapphires.

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

CAT’S EYE

Cat’s Eye describes a gemstone polished into a cabochon that displays a narrow band of concentrated light going accross the width of the stone. This effect, known as chatoyancy, or cat’s eye effect, is caused by inclusions of fine, slender parallel mineral fibers in the gemstone that reflect light in a single band.

Refractive Index 1.740-1.777
Mineral Class                              CHRYSOBERYL
Hardness 8.5

STAR SAPPHIRE

A star sapphire is a type of sapphire that exhibits a star-like phenomenon known as asterism; red stones are known as “star rubies”. Star sapphires contain intersecting needle-like inclusions following the underlying crystal structure that causes the appearance of a six-rayed “star”-shaped pattern when viewed with a single overhead light source.

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

ALEXANDRITE GEMSTONE

Often described by gem aficionados as “emerald by day, ruby by night,” alexandrite is the very rare color-change variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. Originally discovered in Russia’s Ural Mountains in the 1830s, it’s now found in Sri Lanka,

Refractive Index 1.740-1.777
Mineral Class                              CHRYSOBERYL
Hardness 8.5

SPINEL

Spinels range from strong, deep colors to very light pastels, coming in all shades of pink, lavender, red, red-orange, purple, blue, and even black. (Only pure green and yellow appear to be absent). These gems are found on every continent. The varieties are usually referred to by their color. The red and blue varieties are perhaps the most celebrated since they were historically identified as rubies and sapphires. (Spinels are also close to corundum in terms of luster and hardness).

Refractive Index 1.719-1.920
Mineral Class                              SPINEL
Hardness 7.5- 8

TOURMALINE

Often described by gem aficionados as “emerald by day, ruby by night,” alexandrite is the very rare color-change variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. Originally discovered in Russia’s Ural Mountains in the 1830s, it’s now found in Sri Lanka,

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

GARNET

A star sapphire is a type of sapphire that exhibits a star-like phenomenon known as asterism; red stones are known as “star rubies”. Star sapphires contain intersecting needle-like inclusions following the underlying crystal structure that causes the appearance of a six-rayed “star”-shaped pattern when viewed with a single overhead light source.

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9

AQUAMARINE

Often described by gem aficionados as “emerald by day, ruby by night,” alexandrite is the very rare color-change variety of the mineral chrysoberyl. Originally discovered in Russia’s Ural Mountains in the 1830s, it’s now found in Sri Lanka,

Refractive Index 1.76 – 1.77
Mineral Class                              Corundum
Hardness 9